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Microphone Choices: Your Kandy Kolor Questions Kontinued…

7 June 2011 2,958 views No Comment

 

“At The Harmonica Microphone Bench”

with Fritz Hasenpusch 

Down here in the MICROPHONE DUNGEON there’s a veritable kornucopia of possible kolors, an avalanche of additives for personalizing microphone coatings. There are any number of ways to adjust the look and feel of your harpmic by way of the coatings applied to it. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves…

 

On our last visit we looked at the specialized task of prepping a mic (in this case, one with badly pitted chrome skin) for re-coating—whether plating or painting. No matter the methods and materials utilized, careful preparation takes much of the wildcard reactions, questionable results, and gambles out of the process of protecting LORD MICROPHONE. The sanding and stripping, the thorough cleaning, and the PRIMER step are all part of the process. The end result is dependent on your thoroughness with these procedures…

Questions?…

“HEY FRITZ! I’ve taken my totally beat-up 707 down to bare metal. I know the body should be coated with something but I don’t need a finish that draws attention. Is there a way to do a primer finish and just leave it? Is that enough protection?” Signed, RAT ROD FAN

DEAR RAT ROD FAN: Amazingly, the answer to your question’s in your signature. For the uninitiated, the current Rat Rod car culture harkens back to the early days of Hot Rodding, when older cars were stripped-down and modified, then left in what would appear to be an unfinished condition. Rodding in the ruff. Very often the extent of their paint jobs consisted of a shot of primer paint—that’s the in-between the metal and color coats for a typical auto’s paint job. Rat Rodders have their own specialized car shows that feature these recently created retro-rods. You’ll see plenty of nothing-but-primer paint jobs on display… You can think of your 707 as a Rat Rod headlamp—same school of design, really. A good coating of  a metal etching primer will protect the zinc alloy of the microphone from the corrosive stuff your hands produce. It may not wear as well as a catalyzed top coat or a baked-on finish, but it will do the job. The primer finish will provide a secondary benefit: The surface of the primered mic will be easier to hold on to due to the “flat” non-glossy nature of the paint. The short form: YES, a good coat of primer will protect your mic

 

“HEY FRITZ! Now that my old bullet’s been resurfaced and primered, I’m thinking about jazzing-up the appearance with some sparkly stuff in the top coats. What’s up with that? How’s that happen?” Signed, SHOW BOAT 

DEAR SHOW BOAT: A great question with lotsa room for improvisation within the answers. And if you don’t mind hanging around, that happens to be the subject the next time we get together…

THE SHINE OF YOUR KANDY KOLOR QUESTIONS!

THE NEXT TIME WE VISIT…

THE MIC BENCH

Printable Version

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For pictures and descriptions of most of the microphones listed visit http://www.harmonicamasterclass.com/vintage_collection.htm

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